Podcast Episode 055: The Road to Monsanto – Milton Stokes

Dec 27, 2016

“I don’t tell people what to think….I give them something to think about” – Milton Stokes

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The road to Monsanto – an inside look at the life + career of dietitian @miltonstokes Click to Tweet

 

Milton Stokes, PhD, MPH, RDN, FAND

Milton Stokes is the Director of Global Health and Nutrition Outreach for Monsanto where he engages with Registered Dietitians and other health professionals on topics pertaining to food, agriculture, and nutrition.  Before coming to Monsanto, Milton had a professorship and directed a dietetic internship at the University of Saint Joseph in West Hartford, CT.  He also owned a private nutrition counseling practice with offices throughout Connecticut and is a former restaurateur. Milton was a National Media Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in the New York City media market and a freelance writer for consumer magazines covering food, nutrition, and health.  His fourth book was a

Milton was a National Media Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in the New York City media market and a freelance writer for consumer magazines covering food, nutrition, and health.  His fourth book was a New York Times bestseller, and his latest book, “Launching Your Career in Nutrition and Dietetics”, 2nd edition, is a comprehensive and essential guidebook to help dietetics and nutrition students thrive in the classroom as well as during the internship, and landing that first job.

 

Melissa “out standing” in the field at Monsanto’s Vegetable Seed Field Day trip in 2013

Milton in the field at Woodland, California, Vegetable Seed Field Day

 

 

 

 

 

Milton and his family on his daughter’s 5th birthday

 

Here are the resources we mentioned on the show: 

  1. Milton on Twitter
  2. Monsanto Website and Twitter
  3. Milton’s Website and Book
  4. Info about pesticides
  5. Hawaii Farmer’s Daughter on Twitter
  6. Info about Arctic Apples
  7. Book Tomorrow’s Table 
  8. Podcast Episode: The Life of a Farmer and a Dietitian: Jennie Schmidt
  9. GMOanswers.com
  10. U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Website

Produced by Team Podcast

Music by Dave Birk

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3 Comments

  1. Nicole Gonna Garden on December 28, 2016 at 5:28 am

    I really dislike Milton Stoke’s attempt to characterize home gardens as “nostalgic,” as if they were an idea whose time is past. That’s absurd and insulting. Melissa, I am sure you would agree that vegetable gardening is healthful activity, time spent outdoors working in the soil, fresh air, exercise, and the victory of fresh tomatoes. Yes, my home garden may only supplement my trips to the market, but the produce I do harvest is well worth the effort. Stoke’s repeats “weeding” as if that were the only task involved. Has he never heard of mulch?

    • admin on December 28, 2016 at 6:51 pm

      Thank you, Nicole
      I think you might have misunderstood Milton’s point of view. I took his comments to mean that personal/home gardening cannot feed the world. But I’ll let him respond to your question himself. Thank you for listening and for commenting!

      Melissa

      • Milton Stokes on December 28, 2016 at 7:10 pm

        I support gardening in my role at Monsanto. I ensured my daughter’s schools received veggie seed packets for each student (350 plus extras) and I helped support the creation of the school’s teaching garden for all the reasons Nicole mentions. I worked closely with the school RN who lead this charge. She helped integrate STEM activities working with the classroom teachers. Monsanto supports gardens for sure. In fact, we have a home gardening division based in Florida. Connecting people with food and how it’s grown is very important.

        The point I tried to make in the podcast is that my grandparents’ garden was massive (to me as kid) and it took a lot of time and labor to manage it. While the food was amazing, and nothing beats a homegrown tomato, gardening requires extensive resources that may be scarce.

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